A Ruse by Any Other Name
Identifying Fraud on Facebook (with examples!)

Over the last couple of months, there have been a lot of really insidious Facebook profiles cropping up, and I want you guys to be aware of them. Someone — at least I suspect it’s one person, more on that in a moment — has been using the names and likenesses of well-known porn stars to lure people into giving him their credit card numbers. There have been fake profiles of me (like the ones pictured above, none of which are actually mine), Dirk, Rocco Steele, Rogan Richards, Trenton Ducati, Jessie Colter… and those are just the ones I know about.

I suspect there’s a single individual doing this, as the pattern is similar in every case (there’s an amazing example at the end of this post… keep reading!). First, he’ll send you a friend request. If you accept, he’ll start chatting with you, just making small talk… but soon he’ll tell you that he’s offering “a few lucky individuals” — yourself included, natch — a “free” webcam show. All he needs is for you to go to a particular website and enter your credit card details for “age verification” purposes.

And he calls you “buddy”.

I know it goes without saying at this point, but please don’t be fooled by this guy! Dirk and I are fortunate (Trenton, too) in that we have that little blue “Verified by Facebook” checkmark () next to our profiles, so you know it’s us. How we got that checkmark is an interesting story in and of itself — someday I’ll share the details — but suffice it to say that most of our industry colleagues don’t have one. So common sense must prevail. As the old saying goes, if you’re offered something that sounds too good to be true, it probably is. (A “free” show that requires a credit card? Really? And what the fuck does having a credit card have to do with age verification?) You should at the very least exercise a healthy dose of caution. If you have any doubt at all, don’t give away your personal info!

Unfortunately, Facebook doesn’t provide a formal mechanism to get the perpetrator banned permanently. The best available option at the moment is to report fake profiles to Facebook. Here’s how: Just look for the [•••] button on the fake profile’s banner, then report the account for impersonating “Me or someone I know”, then on the next screen choose “Celebrity” — which, if available, seems to work best. Otherwise, choose “Someone I know”. If the profile is removed, the user who created it is banned from Facebook on (what appears to be) a sliding scale; enough offenses and the offender is banned from the site… until he or she creates a new account using a fake email address. The main point to remember is that, unfortunately, fraud is likely here to stay… so the best thing you can do is recognize the behavior so you don’t get fooled.

And now, by way of a rather extraordinary example, I’m posting the entire exchange between the impostor and one of my fans who brilliantly thought to save the whole thing. Reading this will give you a good idea of what to look for when interacting with this guy, and other not-so-artful scam artists.

Be safe out there!

Jesse Jackman Fake Story 1 (No Personal Info)
7 replies
  1. Mike Nolen
    Mike Nolen says:

    This happened to me once and it took months to get my credit cards corrected. Just last week someone tried again (wasn’t even posing as a porn star, just someone wanting to “friend ” me). I didn’t fall for it this time – Jerk tried to guilt trip me “don’t you want to hook up with me?”

    Reply
  2. Gordon Karpen
    Gordon Karpen says:

    7/17/15, 3:20pm
    Very nicely done, Mr. Jackman. I hope it helps get the point across in reaching a result such as them being removed from Facebook.
    Thanks again for likewise putting it to the Facebook community.

    Reply
  3. London_bttm
    London_bttm says:

    Sometimes I wonder is these are actually spambots, like you get on Grindr and some Web chatrooms. Even more annoying if so – the ingenuity!

    Reply
  4. stitch
    stitch says:

    Facebook is crawling with web cammers who message others and are so nice and say they love to show off and have free sites. When you get to their “FREE” site, it’s just another web cam and if you really want to see anything fun, you have to pay for it. When they start that schpiel I block them!

    Reply

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