Classic Meets Fetish 2016

Dirk Caber premieres two original compositions at second annual “Classic Meets Fetish” concert in Berlin (VIDEO)

Back in September, my hubby Dirk Caber — credited under his real name Jack Parton — performed several of his original compositions at the second annual “Classic Meets Fetish” concert in Berlin, in association with Folsom Europe. The video from his performance just been made available! (See above, or watch it on YouTube.) Although it’s been edited down a bit, it still gives you a great idea for the feel of the concert. Enormous thanks to Ron Berlin for shooting and editing this great video!!

Dirk premiered two all-new pieces during his 25-minute programme. The first, his cello sonata, was written expressly for this event and features cellist Leather Paul; it begins at the 1:48 mark in the video. The second, starting at 9:06, is a barcarole, a traditional folk song sung by Venetian gondoliers. Dirk’s barcarole is especially dear to me, as it’s one of the first pieces of music that he’s written for me to learn on our beautiful new piano. (The one that our fans helped us buy… for which we remain eternally grateful!) I’ve gotten to the point where I’m almost ready to play it, but I’ve heard it countless times and it still brings tears to my eyes.

One other note about the video… there’s an awkward moment at the 1:28 mark where Paul, in the middle of Brahms’ cello sonata, abruptly gets up and leaves. It later became apparent that he’d broken a string and had gone to get a different cello. In the moment, though, the audience — not to mention pianist Greg Winn, and Dirk who was turning Greg’s pages — were very confused. But Greg’s response to the awkward silence was absolutely brilliant.

The first “Classic Meets Fetish” concert in 2015 sold close to 300 tickets, and this year’s sold over 800. Next year’s edition will be held in an even larger venue, and the date has already been announced: September 7, 2017. Visit classic-meets-fetish.de for details. Dirk will be there, and I hope to be too. See you there!

Here’s a gallery of photos from this year’s concert, courtesy of Jens Schommer and queer.de… and if you want to hear more of Dirk’s music, check out his SoundCloud page.


13 replies
  1. Marvin Fogel
    Marvin Fogel says:

    Congratulations on your performances, Dirk.. The compositions are lovely to hear. And Jesse, thank you, for posting the videos.

    Reply
  2. Liz L.
    Liz L. says:

    Lovely! I enjoyed the video so much, I played it twice. It was on the second listening that I realized Dirk’s first piece was familiar. He reworked of his “Sonata for Violin and Piano” for a piano and cello duet? It was very nice.

    I’m curious about the page turner – does he need to be able to read music and follow along do he can tell when the page needs turning, or does he take cues from the pianist?

    Reply
    • Jesse
      Jesse says:

      You are correct, it’s a rework of his violin sonata! At Paul’s request, Dirk (Jack) updated it for this performance. Apparently there’s a lot more that goes into it than just transposing the notes. 🙂 I think it sounds pretty amazing on cello, don’t you?

      As for page-turning… it definitely helps to read music, at least enough to follow along. I’m a passable page-turner, unless the music is super-fast or super-complicated. That said, it’s not strictly required; if the assistant can’t read music or gets lost, the pianist can cue the page turn. For example, in the performance of Dirk’s flute sonata, you can occasionally see the pianist nodding her head as a signal to her assistant: http://jessejackman.xxx/2015/02/04/classical-caber-flute-sonata-live. I don’t think it’s because the page-turner couldn’t read music… I think she might simply have gotten a little lost. There are some passages in the piece that are particularly “thorny,” as Dirk would say.

      Reply
      • Liz L.
        Liz L. says:

        Oh yes, I agree, the cello version is amazing, and I’d almost say that I like it better than the violin version, but that would be based on a comparison of the audio from the CD verses the audio from a YouTube video. The sonata is one of my favorite pieces from the CD – it has what I can only describe as a haunting quality that really gets to me. The cello takes that sound to a deeper level.

        I have no doubt that converting the piece from violin to cello was not a simple task. Well done, Jack.

        Reply
  3. Don Howard
    Don Howard says:

    Thanks so much, Jesse. All the Classical Caber posts are fascinating glimpses into Dirk’s talents as a composer and performer. A few thoughts, comments, ideas:
    -The shots in the video that showed Dirk’s face reflected in the piano also showed part of the score. It seemed that the music in the score was from the cello sonata while the music playing on the track was from the bagatelles and morceaux for piano. Creative editing?
    -I was recently listening to Georges Bizet’s “Jeux d’enfants” for piano four hands and thought how great it would be for Dirk to compose a piano four hands work for the two of you to play together. I have faith that he could work out the different skill levels. It would make an exciting gift to share with your friends and fans.
    -On a note unrelated to his music, what was Dirk wearing around his neck? It looks really interesting.

    Reply
    • Jesse
      Jesse says:

      You’re most welcome! Yes, likely creative editing… you have a good eye, noticing that alto clef on the sheet music!

      I think if he were to write a four-hand piece for us to play, that would be awesome! I’ll float the idea by him. That said… we may or may not have already been practicing a little (non-Dirk-composed) four-hand piece already. 😉

      Reply
      • Don Howard
        Don Howard says:

        Yea for the possibility of you sharing a four-hand piano piece (even if it’s not a Dirk-composed work).
        Yikes for the megalodon tooth, but wow for the spectacular setting.

        Reply
    • Ron-Berlin
      Ron-Berlin says:

      Sure, it was “creative editing” (and I am a private singer and not a real musican 🙂 while producing this video.
      I love all parts of Dirk alias Jack (spacielly his face!) and I was very proud to tape some shortcuts while the sound check in the afternoon before the great performance, too.

      By the way, I am just wondering:
      Nobody was telling me “Thank you Ron-Berlin” for producing and bringing out this short-movie. That`s live but not very polite I think 🙂 Many weeks before I sended Dirk this video but I never got an answer if it was arrived…

      Ron from Germany, Berlin.

      Reply
      • Jesse
        Jesse says:

        I deeply apologize, sir… the fault is mine. I spent a lot of time writing this post and yet I completely forgot to credit you. 🙁 That’s been remedied, and I provided a link to your YouTube page in the post as well. If there’s anywhere else you’d like me to link to as well, please let me know.

        Reply
  4. Lyne
    Lyne says:

    Thank you so much for sharing. Hearing a familiar piece but with another instrument is elating. Hearing him play it also brought tears to my eyes. Yes Jesse you can roll your eyes at me but you know I love everything he does. I’m a bit disappointed he did not perform Pendant Melody… Just kidding of course. Of course I cannot post something without asking a question, does playing on a regular piano with strings as opposed to the digital one you have at home makes a difference in the way he will play?

    Last thing, when will Dirk record the pieces from the Piano For Dirk Campaign?

    I hope you get to go to Berlin and see next year’s performance.

    Reply

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